Scarlett Johansson’s ‘bizarre’ fake orgasms made Joaquin Phoenix flee ‘Her’ set

He said “oh no” when she faked her big O.

Actor Joaquin Phoenix was apparently so skeeved out by Scarlett Johansson having to record fake orgasms for the 2013 film “Her” that he would have to leave the set at times, she told the “Armchair Expert” podcast.

“We tried to get through one take, and he was, like, losing it,” Johansson, 37, said of the film revolving around a man falling in love with a virtual assistant.

Scarlett Johansson had to record fake orgasms on the set of "Her" and Joaquin Phoenix was not a fan.
Scarlett Johansson (right) had to record fake orgasms on the set of the 2013 film “Her,” and Joaquin Phoenix was not a fan.
Getty Images

“He left the studio. He needed a break.”

The “Joker” actor, 47, wasn’t the only one admittedly weirded out by the “bizarre” requirement while filming “Her.” Johansson, too, was repulsed by having to hear herself pretend to climax, she said.

Joaquin Phoenix as Theodore
In “Her,” Joaquin Phoenix starred as mild-mannered Theodore, a man who fell in love with an artificially intelligent virtual assistant named Samantha, voiced by Scarlett Johansson.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture

“You don’t want to hear your voice ever. You definitely don’t want to hear what you sound like having an orgasm,” the “Avengers” star added.

“You definitely don’t want to hear what you sound like having a fake orgasm — ew. It’s so gross. It was so bizarre.”

Hearing Scarlett Johansson record fake orgams on the set of "Her" freaked out Joaquin Phoenix.
Hearing Scarlett Johansson (right) record fake orgasms on the set of “Her” freaked out Joaquin Phoenix (left).
Getty Images

During the same interview with “Armchair Expert” podcast host Dax Shepard, Johansson recalled being “hypersexualized” as a young actress.

“I kind of became objectified and pigeonholed in this way where I felt like I wasn’t getting offers for work for things that I wanted to do,” Johansson said, later adding that she remembers being in “situations that were not age appropriate.”

“Now, I see younger actors that are in their 20s. It feels like they’re allowed to be all these different things,” she continued. “It’s another time, too. We’re not even allowed to really pigeonhole other actors anymore, thankfully, right? People are much more dynamic.”