Jeffrey Dahmer interviewer reveals why killer ate victims: ‘So desperately lonely’


It wasn’t out of culinary curiosity, that’s for sure.

With interest in Jeffrey Dahmer skyrocketing thanks to the hit Netflix miniseries “Dahmer —Monster,” a journalist who interviewed the Milwaukee Monster in person has revealed the shocking reason why he ate his victims. Emmy-winning producer Nancy Glass dropped the grisly bombshell during a Wednesday appearance on the Australian radio show “Kyle & Jackie O.”

“He said he chose to eat them because he wanted them to be part of him,” declared Glass, 67, who runs Glass Entertainment Group, the Daily Mail reported. “He was so desperate, so desperately lonely, so ashamed of being gay.”

The TV broadcaster had famously spoken to the then-imprisoned killer in 1993 for the TV show “Inside Edition,” marking the first time Dahmer had been interviewed in public since receiving a life sentence for his crimes. It reportedly took 18 months to secure the exclusive — a process that required Glass to establish a relationship with the killer’s family.

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Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer is interviewed by Nancy Glass at Columbia Correctional Facility in Portage, Wisconsin on January 12, 1993 for CNN's "Inside Edition."
Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer (left) is interviewed by Nancy Glass at Columbia Correctional Institution in Portage, Wisconsin, on Jan. 12, 1993 for “Inside Edition.”

"He said he chose to eat them because he wanted them to be part of him," said Nancy Glass, 67, while describing Jeffrey Dahmer's alleged motive for cannibalizing his victim's corpses.
“He said he chose to eat them because he wanted them to be part of him,” said Nancy Glass, now 67, while describing Jeffrey Dahmer’s alleged motive for ingesting his victim’s corpses.

Evan Peters as the titular character in "Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story."
Actor Evan Peters as the titular character in “Dahmer — Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story.”

During these candid one-on-ones, the journalist attempted to delve into the mind of the man-eater, who had notoriously murdered 17 men and boys — and ate some of their corpses — between 1978 and 1991 before getting apprehended. He was then beaten to death by fellow inmate Christopher Scarver in 1994.

Glass concluded that — unlike fictional cannibal Hannibal Lecter, who relished the taste of human flesh — Dahmer consumed his victims out of loneliness. She disclosed that the Wisconsinite suffered from “bonding” problems caused by his mother, who wouldn’t let anyone touch Dahmer as a baby “except to change his diaper,” per the Daily Mail.

As a result, the Milwaukee Cannibal reportedly suffered from severe abandonment issues, which, in his twisted mind, could only be remedied by eating people, thereby ensuring they would be with him forever. Glass also disclosed that Dahmer’s mother — who passed away in 2000 — had been downing many prescription medications while pregnant with him, which may have contributed to his warped mental state.

Suspected serial killer Jeffrey L. Dahmer enters the courtroom of judge Jeffrey A. Wagner on August 6, 1991.
Suspected serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer enters the courtroom of Judge Jeffrey A. Wagner on Aug. 6, 1991.
AFP via Getty Images

Elsewhere in the interview, the serial-killer whisperer claimed that Dahmer dosed people with chemicals because he wanted to create mindless slaves, presumably so they couldn’t leave him.

“‘He injected drugs into people,” she said, describing the killer’s methods. “He drilled holes in some and poured acid into everything he could, because he wanted to create a zombie.”

Despite his appalling crimes, Glass claimed that Dahmer seemed “perfectly normal” in person.

“It was odd. I mean, you can hear the way he’s talking to me is very thoughtful,” the reporter recalled. “He contemplated, but he’s a psychopath.”

She added, “He says to me, ‘I’m sorry for what I did.’ But he’s a psychopath. He doesn’t even know what those words mean.”

A mug shot of Jeffrey Dahmer taken on July 23, 1991 by the Milwaukee Police Department.
A mug shot of Jeffrey Dahmer taken on July 23, 1991, by the Milwaukee Police Department.
Milwaukee Police Department

Nonetheless, Glass told the “Kyle & Jackie O” hosts that she never felt sorry for Dahmer during their prison correspondences. She added that she maintained professional distance and withheld judgment just as she would when interviewing any public figure.

“You guys interview how many people?” Glass explained while describing her process. “And basically I’m the same as you. You go at it from a very professional standpoint.”

She added, “When you’re you’re interviewing a politician. You’re careful, right? You don’t judge. But ask the question so that everybody listening can judge — and that was my job.”

The revelations come as Ryan Murphy’s “Dahmer — Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story,” has smashed streaming records on Netflix. The series, which stars Evan Peters in the title role, became the platform’s ninth most-watched English-language show of all time, logging a whopping 496.1 million viewing hours to date, per Variety.

Meanwhile, at least 56 million homes have watched all 10 episodes of the series, which follows the blood-spattered escapades of Dahmer as told from the points of view of his victims.

"Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer" story is one of Netflix's most-watched shows of all time.
“Dahmer — Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer” story is one of Netflix’s most-watched shows of all time.
Netflix

While undoubtedly popular, “Dahmer” also sparked a backlash from many of the serial killer’s victims’ families, who felt like watching the show made them relive past trauma.

One of the incensed relatives, Eric Perry, whose 19-year-old cousin Errol Lindsey was brutally murdered by Dahmer in July 1991, wrote on Twitter: “I’m not telling anyone what to watch, I know true crime media is huge rn, but if you’re actually curious about the victims, my family (the Isbell’s) are pissed about this show.”

He also included an eerie side-by-side, juxtaposing a pic of his cousin, Rita Isbell, testifying at Dahmer’s trial with one of the series’ reenactments.

Isbell claimed that Netflix did not consult or pay her for the reenactment of her emotional courtroom outburst.

Nancy Glass walks the red carpet during the Philly Fights Cancer: Round 5 Event benefiting Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on October 26, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Nancy Glass walks the red carpet during the Philly Fights Cancer: Round 5 event benefiting Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on Oct. 26, 2019, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Getty Images for Philly Fights Cancer

“When I saw some of the show, it bothered me, especially when I saw myself — when I saw my name come across the screen and this lady saying verbatim exactly what I said,” Isbell reportedly said. “If I didn’t know any better, I would’ve thought it was me. Her hair was like mine, she had on the same clothes.”

She added, “That’s why it felt like reliving it all over again. It brought back all the emotions I was feeling back then.”