Priscilla Presley fights Elvis racism claims: ‘He loved, loved being around blacks’


Elvis Presley’s ex-wife, Priscilla, is attempting to set the record straight on the iconic musician’s beliefs.

The singer’s legacy was recently cemented in the biopic “Elvis” — directed by Baz Luhrmann with Austin Butler in the title role — and depicted Elvis being very affected by the civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr.’s passing, as well as his relationship with B.B. King.

However, Priscilla, 77, is knocking down longstanding assumptions that her former husband had issues with people of color.

“Per the movie, [for] a long time it was stated that Elvis was a racist,” the “Naked Gun” actress said on “Piers Morgan Uncensored” earlier this week.

“He was not a racist. He had never been a racist. He had friends, black friends, friends from all over,” Priscilla said. “He loved their music, he loved their style. He loved being around black musicians.”

She also noted he had longstanding friendships with icons such as Fats Domino and Sammy Davis Jr.

“He loved, loved being around blacks,” he added. “He loved being around anyone, actually.

“He was not prejudiced in any way. He was not racist in any way. It’s like we’re looking for something from everyone so we can somehow expose them in some way,” Priscilla further claimed. “It’s frightening right now.”

Morgan then wondered if the “Heartbreak Hotel” crooner would be able to “survive this weird cancel culture that we now have to endure.”

“I think of that often. What would Elvis think? He wouldn’t believe what is going on right now in this country, or all over, what’s happening to this planet,” she told the British broadcaster. “Us as a country, it’s truly baffling,”

Austin Butler embodies the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Baz Luhrmann’s film, “Elvis.”
AP

Legendary music producer Quincy Jones divulged to the Hollywood Reporter last year that he refused to work with Elvis after orchestra conductor Tommy Dorsey declined to play with him in the 1950s.

“He was a racist mother — I’m going to shut up now,” Jones, 89, said. “But every time I saw Elvis, he was being coached by [‘Don’t Be Cruel’ songwriter] Otis Blackwell, telling him how to sing.” Blackwell previously told David Letterman that he and Elvis had never actually met in the five years Blackwell wrote songs for him.